Word Wangling is a collection of fun word games to help you look for patterns, shapes and relationships between letters and words.

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Did you get all the answers? Were any questions tricky for you?

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ellen's picture
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ellen 2 August, 2013 - 10:47

Hello JoEditor
I want to ask something, please....
When I am used to Get and Have to do?
I dont understand this theme.
please.....

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JoEditor's picture
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JoEditor 2 August, 2013 - 11:27

Hi ellen,
That's a difficult question. 'Get' can be used in so many different ways that I can't explain them all here. My advice is that every time you read or listen to an expression or a phrase with 'get,' focus on the meaning and take time to think about what it means in the context. We have a Grammar snack coming soon that will explain when we use 'Have to...'  so keep checking the Grammar snacks section over the coming weeks. 
Best wishes, Jo (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

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Jonathan - Coordinator's picture
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Jonathan - Coor... 14 June, 2013 - 04:02

Hi nizan1oren! It's a kind of device used to stretch shoes and help them keep their shape. Have you tried the other games too?
Jonathan (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

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Jonathan - Coordinator's picture
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Jonathan - Coor... 11 May, 2013 - 11:24

Hi rea badu! You'll get a point for each comment you write, and every time somebody clicks on the red heart to 'like' your comment you'll get a point too (as I have just done). Welcome to LearnEnglish Teens and enjoy the website!
Jonathan (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

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sobmdpteen's picture
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sobmdpteen 26 March, 2013 - 13:09

Why "get a headache" instead of "have a headache"

Doesn't it depends on the context? "I will get a headache" and "I already have a headache"

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Jo - Coordinator's picture
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Jo - Coordinator 26 March, 2013 - 13:19

Hi sobmdpteen,

Yes, you're exactly right. "get a headache" describes the process of the headache starting. For example,  "It's so hot in here, I'm getting a headache". = a headache is starting.

After that, we usually use "have a headache".  For example: "I don't feel very well. I have a headache."

Hope that clears up the confusion!

Joanna (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

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