At the shop

Gemma goes to the shop.

Instructions

Do the preparation exercise first. Then watch the video and follow the instructions to practise your speaking.

Transcript

Shopkeeper: Hi. Can I help you?
Gemma: Hello. How much is this magazine?
Shopkeeper: Let’s see … Top Sounds, that’s £1.99.
Gemma: OK, can I have the magazine and do you have a bottle of water?
Shopkeeper: Yes.
Gemma: Have you got cold ones?
Shopkeeper: Over there in the fridge. Is that everything?
Gemma: I think so. Oh … and these sweets.
Shopkeeper: OK.
Gemma: How much is that?
Shopkeeper: That’s £3.40, please.
Gemma: Here you are.
Shopkeeper: Thank you … and there’s £1.60 change. Would you like a bag?
Gemma: No, it’s fine, thanks. Bye.
Shopkeeper: Bye.

Shopkeeper: Hi. Can I help you?
Gemma: Hello. H__ m___ is this magazine?
Shopkeeper: Let’s see … Top Sounds, that’s £1.99.
Gemma: OK, c__ I h___ the magazine and d__ you h___ a bottle of water?
Shopkeeper: Yes.
Gemma: H___ you g__ cold ones?
Shopkeeper: Over there in the fridge. Is that everything?
Gemma: I t____ s__. Oh … and these sweets.
Shopkeeper: OK.
Gemma: How m___ is that?
Shopkeeper: That’s £3.40, please.
Gemma: H___ you a__.
Shopkeeper: Thank you … and there’s £1.60 change. Would you like a bag?
Gemma: No, it’s f___, t_____. Bye.
Shopkeeper: Bye. 

Discussion

What new phrases have you learned from this video?

Language level
Average: 3.8 (24 votes)
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Comments

Profile picture for user Jonathan - Coordinator

Submitted by Jonathan - Coo… on Thu, 05/31/2018 - 03:11

Hi Pippatwo. Both of those phrases can be used. 'Have you got ...?' has the same meaning as 'Do you have ...?' - it's asking if you have, own or possess something. There are other forms of it too (e.g. I've got, She's got, They've got, I haven't got, etc.).

Here are a couple more things to know about 'have you got'.

  • It's much more common in British English than American English.
  • It's much more common in speaking than writing.

Jonathan (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

In reply to by Pippatwo

Submitted by felixminecraft on Sat, 04/21/2018 - 08:59

I have discovered that the word sweets means caramelle or dolci.

Submitted by Grozinho on Sun, 02/25/2018 - 13:40

I understand better the use of 'ones' and 'one'.

Submitted by p_martinez20 on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 18:08

That's a good video.

Submitted by marygee on Fri, 02/02/2018 - 12:43

hi there, anybody help me when the girl give the money to shope keeper why she said here you are while she is giving the money.please anybody help me.
Profile picture for user Tina - Coordinator

Submitted by Tina - Coordinator on Sat, 02/03/2018 - 09:21

Hi marygee! 
You can say 'Here you are' when you are handing something to someone. So in this video the girl is giving the money to the shop keeper, so it is highlighting the action that she is doing to the shopkeeper.
Best wishes, Tina (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

In reply to by marygee

Submitted by marygee on Wed, 02/07/2018 - 06:01

thanx alot keep helping me and encouraging me .Godbless you.

In reply to by Tina - Coordinator

Submitted by marygee on Wed, 02/07/2018 - 06:04

okhay kindly tell me when the shop keeper asked "is that everything " what is that meaning.

In reply to by Tina - Coordinator

Profile picture for user Tina - Coordinator

Submitted by Tina - Coordinator on Wed, 02/07/2018 - 08:04

Hello marygee!
When the shop keeper asked 'Is that everything?', he's asking if the customer would like anything else.
Best wishes, Tina (LearnEnglish Teens Team)

In reply to by marygee

Profile picture for user qussai595

Submitted by qussai595 on Wed, 01/31/2018 - 14:07

easy

Submitted by elr786 on Sun, 01/28/2018 - 20:17

it was very informative, but i do not understand the meaning of "Have you got cold ones" please explain it. thanks
Profile picture for user Jo - Coordinator

Submitted by Jo - Coordinator on Mon, 01/29/2018 - 07:53

Hello elr786! I'm happy you liked the video. 'one' or 'ones' can be used as a pronoun to avoid repeating a noun that you have already mentioned. In this case 'ones' refers to 'bottles of water'. In different contexts it can represent a different thing.

I don't have a pen. Have you got one? (= a pen)
I'd like to join a gym. Do you know if there is one (= a gym) in this area?
We need to buy bananas. Those ones (=bananas) look perfect.

Hope that helps! Best wishes, Joanna (LearnEnglish Teens team)

 

In reply to by elr786

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